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Highly Integrated Low Power Radars for Health & Automotive Applications

Highly Integrated Low Power Radars for Health & Automotive Applications

Copyright: 2014
Pages: 232
ISBN: 9781608076666

In recent years, advances in radio detection and ranging technology, sustained by new achievements in the fields of signal processing and electronic components, have permitted the adoption of radars in many civil and defense applications. This resource discusses how highly integrated radar has been adopted by several new markets such as contactless vital sign monitoring (heart rate, breath rate) or harbour traffic control, as well as several applications for vehicle driver assistance. You are provided with scenarios, applications, and requirements, while focusing on the trade-offs between flexibility, programmability, power consumption, size and weight, and complexity.
Preface. Acknowledgments. ; Scenarios, Applications, and Requirements for Highly Integrated Low-Power Radar - References.; Radar Integration Levels, Technology Trends, and Transceivers - Radar Integration Levels. Next Steps in Radar Miniaturization. Integrated Antennas. Semiconductor Technology and Devices for Integrated Radar. Trends in IC Radar Design. Radar Transceivers. ; Hardware-Software Implementing Platforms for Radar Digital Signal Processing - Implementing Platforms and Performance Metrics for Radar Signal Processing. Hardware-Software Architecture for a Cost-Effective Radar. DSP and GPU for Radar Signal Processing. FPGA for Radar Signal Processing. Conclusions. ; Radar for E-Health Applications: Signal Processing Perspective - General Characteristic of the Sensor and Its Functions. CW Doppler Radar for Health Care Monitoring. Choice of Carrier Frequency. Phase Noise and Range-Correlation. Front-End Architectures. UWB Radar for Health Care Monitoring. UWB Radar with Correlator. Conclusions.; Radar for Automotive Applications: Signal Processing Perspective - General Characteristic of the Sensor and Its Functions. Signal Processing for the Single Sensor. SRR Radar. Conclusions.; Low-Power Radar Front-End for E-Health and Harbor Surveillance: Implementation Examples - Summary. Miniaturized Radar for E-Health. Microwave Integrated Circuit. Low-Cost Radar Prototype for Harbor Surveillance.; Automotive Radar IC Design: 24-GHz UWB and 77-GHz FMCW Implementation Examples - Silicon Technologies for Automotive Radar. A Fully Integrated 24-GHz UWB SRR Sensor. Transmitter Chipset for 24-/77-GHz Automotive Radar Sensors. W-Band TX Front-End for FMCW Automotive Radar. W-Band RX Front-End for FMCW Automotive Radar.; References. Conclusions. List of Acronyms. About the Authors. Index. ;
  • Maria Greco Maria Greco is associate professor in the Department of Information Engineering at the University of Pisa, Italy. She earned her Ph.D. in telecommunication engineering from the University of Pisa.
  • Bruno Neri Bruno Neri is a professor of electronics and director of the Department of Information Engineering at the University of Pisa, Italy. He earned his laurea degree cum laude from the University of Pisa.
  • Giuseppe Palmisano Giuseppe Palmisano leads the Radio Frequency Advanced Design Center (RF-ADC) in Catania, Italy. He earned his laurea degree in electronic engineering from the University of Pavia, Italy.
  • Egidio Ragonese Egidio Ragonese is RF/analog IC senior designer and project leader at the Radio Frequency Advanced Design Center (RF-ADC). He earned his Ph.D. in electronics and automation engineering from the University of Catania, Italy.
  • Sergio Saponara Sergio Saponara is associate member of the Italian National Institutes for Nuclear Physics (INFN) and of the National Inter-University Consortium for Telecommunications (CNIT). He earned his Ph.D. in electronic engineering from the University of Pisa, Italy.
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